Understanding All Voltage Configurations from the Motherboard

AMD Processors – Chipset Options

Chipset-related options include all voltages that are not the ones described on the previous page. They include:

  • NB Voltage: If you made sure that the “NB Voltage” option on your motherboard does not relate to the CPU VDDNB voltage (see previous page), then this option refers to the voltage from the North Bridge chip from the chipset.
  • NB 1.8 V Voltage: Chipsets from AMD use two separate voltages: one with 1.2 V (which is configured through the option above and called VDD_CORE) and another with 1.8 V, which is configured through this option, and is usually the voltage used by the chipset clock multiplier circuit (PLL, Phase-Locked Loop).
  • FCH Voltage: Chipsets targeted to “APUs” (CPUs with integrated graphics controller) are called FCHs (Fusion Controller Hubs). Therefore, this option controls the chipset voltage and is equivalent to the “NB Voltage” option.
  • Graphics engine voltage: This option, available on some motherboards with on-board video, allows you to increase the voltage from the chipset integrated video controller, which is useful if you are overclocking the motherboard graphics engine. This option is also known as “mGPU Voltage,” “IGD Voltage,” and “IGP Voltage.”
  • SidePort voltage: This is the voltage that feeds an on-board video memory chip used by the on-board graphics engine from the motherboard, on motherboards that have this feature.
  • SB voltage: This is the voltage to be used by the South Bridge chip from the chipset.
  • PCI Express voltage: This is the voltage to be used on the PCI Express lanes that are connected to the chipset. You may want to raise it if you overclock these lanes. It can be found through options such as “PCIE VDDA Voltage,” “VDD PCIE Voltage,” and “PCI-E Over Voltage.”

Author: Gabriel Torres

Gabriel Torres is a Brazilian best-selling ICT expert, with 24 books published. He started his online career in 1996, when he launched Clube do Hardware, which is one of the oldest and largest websites about technology in Brazil. He created Hardware Secrets in 1999 to expand his knowledge outside his home country.

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