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Playing with the MS-3 on the Surface 1030 XL

The MS-3 is excellent for big-handed players and favors the palm grip style of play. However, we found it surprisingly good with a claw grip style, thanks to the rests for the ring finger and pinkie that ended up helping the mouse to be more maneuverable with the fingertips.

The button distribution around the thumb is great and prevents accidental clicking. The audio mute button, which we programmed to plant claymore mines on Battlefield 3, is very well positioned. However, we found the profile button, located on the upper right corner, too far away to be easily reached. But that’s the beauty of the MS-3: with so many options, the right-handed user is bound to find a button that suits his or her needs.

Mouse MS-3Figure 13: Illuminated mouse

In comparison to models that have already broken the barrier of 6,000 dpi of resolution, the MS-3’s upper limit of 5,670 dpi is very acceptable. As always, we suggest a lower resolution for a more accurate aim, and a higher resolution to select multiple units or enemies when playing RTS or MMORPGs. The MS-3 gave a better response on the glossy side of the Surface 1030 XL; it felt quicker and more agile despite its big size. With nine rubber feet, the mousepad took a beating but never let go of the table. The rounded edges didn’t hurt our wrist like other mousepads do.

Programming the MS-3 is a nice experience due to the simplicity and elegance of the interface. It is nice to see a clear design in contrast with the “dark and edgy” vibe with these kinds of applications. In macro recording, however, the user cannot edit delays between keystrokes, and if he or she makes a mistake, they have to start over again.

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A self-assumed gadget-freak and an avid gamer, André Gordirro has written about pop culture, Internet and technology for the past ten years. He works for SET Magazine, Brazil's biggest movie magazine, and usually contributes to its technology section writing about consumer products. His body lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – although his mind is said to inhabit cyberspace.