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Conclusions

Even though the new Thermaltake Armor A60 is based on the Armor A90, it has a set of features that makes it better than its predecessor. In fact, this is the first time that we see a product with a “lower” model number being better than a product with a “higher” model number. The A90 was originally quoted at USD 90, but since Thermaltake also released the A60 at USD 90, they dropped the price of the A90 to USD 80. We think the new A60 provides a terrific cost/benefit ratio for users that have USD 90 to spend on a computer case.

Strong Points

  • Hot swap bay for one 3.5”/2.5” drive that is accessible from outside the case
  • All internal 3.5” bays support 2.5” devices
  • Air filter for the front fan
  • Air filter for the power supply fan
  • Meshed bay covers with air filters
  • Screwless mechanisms for 5.25” and internal 3.5” drives
  • A hole in the motherboard tray for accessing the backplate of the CPU cooler
  • eSATA port
  • USB 3.0 port
  • Terrific number of hard disk drive bays (six) that will please even the most hardcore user
  • No sharp edges where you could cut yourself while building your PC
  • Anti-theft device for peripherals (keyboard, mouse, etc) and support for a padlock
  • Adjustable support bracket for the power supply
  • Support for three additional fans

Weak Points

  • No air filter for the optional side and bottom fans
  • No thumbscrews for holding expansion cards
  • No anti-vibration mechanism for the hard disk drives
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Gabriel Torres is a Brazilian best-selling ICT expert, with 24 books published. He started his online career in 1996, when he launched Clube do Hardware, which is one of the oldest and largest websites about technology in Brazil. He created Hardware Secrets in 1999 to expand his knowledge outside his home country.