Lian Li PC-7F Case Review
By Gabriel Torres on December 15, 2008


Introduction

Hardware Secrets Golden Award

PC-7F is an all-aluminum mid-tower case from Lian Li coming in two color options, black or silver, and two side panel options, solid or with a transparent side window (this version is also known as PC-7FW). It comes with a very attractive price tag (USD 130 - USD 140 in the US) and features that will certainly please the average user. Is this a good product? Let’s see.

PC-7F is identical to another case from Lian Li, PC-60F. The difference between the two is the design of the opening for air intake on the front panel.

We reviewed the black version with a transparent side window.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 1: Lian Li PC-7F.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 2: Lian Li PC-7F.

In Figure 3, you can see its front panel – this case has no door. It has five 5.25” external bays, the lower one coming with a 3.5” adapter that can be used by either a floppy disk drive, a memory card reader or by a hard disk drive (the adapter has holes matching those on a hard drive, allowing this installation).

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 3: Front panel.

Introduction (Contíd)

This case comes with a 140 mm fan rotating at 900 rpm and glowing blue when turned on installed on the front panel featuring a washable dust filter, which is an excellent feature to have. You need, however, to remove the front panel to have access to this filter. This fan is positioned right in front of the hard disk drive cage, as we will show you later.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 4: Front 140 mm fan and washable dust filter.

All fans from this case use a motherboard three-pin connector, allowing you to connect them directly to your motherboard and thus monitor their speed. They also come with adapters to install them directly to the power supply. No speed control feature is provided.

The small panel containing the audio and USB connectors is located on the top of the case and are protected by a cover. This case provides one FireWire port, but the FireWire and the two USB ports are too close to each other, preventing you from installing two “fat” USB devices at the same time. The addition of one eSATA port would be nice.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 5: Available connectors.

The rear panel from PC-7F can be seen in Figure 6. The power supply must be installed on the lower section of the case. This case has seven expansion slots, one 120 mm fan on the rear and two holes for the hoses of an external water cooling solution, which use rubber covers to protect them, so you won’t need to drill or break anything on this case if you want to have such solution.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 6: Rear panel.

The side panels are fastened to the case using thumbscrews, which is always nice. The left panel has a hook for adding a padlock or a seal (like a warranty seal).

Now let’s take a look inside PC-7F.

Inside PC-7F

In Figure 7 we can have an overall look inside Lian Li PC-7F. Even though we can remove the right panel the motherboard tray is permanently attached to the chassis.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 7: Inside PC-7F.

Daughter boards are fastened to the case using thumbscrews, which we think is the best option. Screwless mechanisms for holding daughterboards usually are made of cheap plastic and thus break quite easily.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 8: Rear panel.

This case has only two fans and there is no place for installing additional fans. Thus user worried about ventilation will probably want a different case.

Now let’s take an in-depth look at the disk drive options from the reviewed case.

The Disk Drive Bays

This case has five external 5.25” bays and one of them comes with an adapter for installing a 3.5” device, which can be a floppy disk drive, a memory card reader or a hard disk drive (the adapter has all the necessary holes).Only the two top 5.25” bays use screwless mechanisms.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 9: Disk drive bays.

The hard disk drive bays are the highlight of this case. Each bay is a removable aluminum drawer that uses an anti-vibration mechanism to prevent the natural vibration produced by the hard disk drives from being propagated to the chassis. As you can see in Figure 10, the front 140 mm fan is in charge of cooling down the hard disk drives.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 10: Hard disk drive bays.

Each drawer has a big plastic latch on top to lock the hard drive in place. If you don’t feel secure with this mechanism you can add one screw to each side of the drawer to fasten the hard drive. In this case the drawer won't be a screwless system anymore, of course.

Lian Li PC-7F Case
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Figure 11: Hard disk drive drawer.

The number of hard disk drive bays – four – is more than sufficient for the average user, but high-end users may need more bays. If this is your case you will need to look for a different (and more expensive) product.

Since you can use the adapter that comes in the lower 5 1/4" bay to install a hard disk drive you can have up to five hard disk drives with this case, if you don’t have an external 3.5” device, of course.

Main Specifications

Lian Li PC-7F case main specs include:

* Researched at Newegg.com on the day we published this review.

Conclusions

Lian Lin PC-7F is a mid-tower case targeted to the average user that wants a high-quality all-aluminum case but doesn’t want to sell a kidney to buy an overpriced product. Here is a summary of what we found about this product.

Strong Points

Weak Points

In summary, we think this is a terrific product for the average user. It is a high-quality all-aluminum mid-tower case quoted on the same price range of good steel cases. So for the same price of a high-end steel case you can take home this all-aluminum product, which is lighter and dissipates heat better. High-end users, however, may not like some of the limitations from this case, especially the low number of fans and reduced number of hard disk drive bays compared to other products. But this isn’t exactly a problem, as this kind of user would be looking for a different product anyway.

Originally at http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Lian-Li-PC-7F-Case-Review/671


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