Inside the Macintosh SE

The Macintosh SE

In Figures 6 and 7, you have an overall look at the Macintosh SE. Similarly to the previous Macintosh models, the Macintosh SE had a brightness adjustment button on its front panel, below the Apple logo.

Macintosh SE TutorialFigure 6: The Macintosh SE

Macintosh SE TutorialFigure 7: The Macintosh SE

Macintosh SE TutorialFigure 8: The brightness adjustment

The Macintosh SE is easy to identify, as it has “Macintosh SE” written on its front panel and on its rear panel as well. However, four different versions of the Macintosh SE were released. On the next page, we address their differences and how to identify the exact model you may have.

A minor difference between the Macintosh SE and the previous models was the kind and location of the battery in charge of the computer’s real time clock. While in the previous models this battery was accessible through the rear panel, on the Macintosh SE this battery was installed on the motherboard.

As with the previous models, the Macintosh SE allowed you to install an anti-theft device that was a metallic tab for installing a steel cable to prevent people from stealing the computer, which was highly desirable in public spaces such as schools.

In Figure 9, you can see the connectors available at the rear panel of the Macintosh SE. The first two connectors were the ADB connectors for you to install the mouse and the keyboard. Next, there was a port for the installation of an external floppy disk drive. Then there was an external 25-pin SCSI port, which allowed you to install external SCSI devices (such as an external hard drive) to the computer.

There were two serial ports: one for a printer and one for an external modem, using the same kind of connector introduced with the Macintosh Plus. (The Macintosh 128K and the Macintosh 512K also had two serial ports, but with the Macintosh Plus, Apple changed the connector type used for them from DE-9 to DIN-8, which became the standard for future Apple computers.)

The last connector was a 3.5 mm connector for an external speaker (the computer had an internal speaker).

Macintosh SE TutorialFigure 9: The rear connectors

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Author: Gabriel Torres

Gabriel Torres is a Brazilian best-selling ICT expert, with 24 books published. He started his online career in 1996, when he launched Clube do Hardware, which is one of the oldest and largest websites about technology in Brazil. He created Hardware Secrets in 1999 to expand his knowledge outside his home country.

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