How To Make P2P Programs to Work on Networks Using a Broadband Router

Configuring Windows XP Firewall

Windows XP SP2 has an internal firewall that blocks P2P connections (if you don’t have SP2 installed you won’t have Windows Firewall installed). So we must configure Windows XP in order to “open” the ports used. If you have another firewall program installed such as ZoneAlarm or Norton Personal Firewall, you will need to make this procedure on your firewall program. After running your P2P program for the first time you probably unblocked it on Windows Firewall (by clicking on Unblock on the screen shown in Figure 5) but this isn’t enough.

eMule Windows FirewallFigure 5: Windows asks you if you want to unblock your P2P program when you run it for the first time.

Open Control Panel, Windows Firewall and click on Exceptions tab. Your P2P program will probably be already listed there, as you can see in Figure 6, where eMule was already being listed. If not, click on Add program and choose your P2P program.

Windows FirewallFigure 6: Configuring Windows Firewall.

Even if your P2P program is already listed on Windows Firewall Exceptions tab you need to click on Add port. Then give a name to this rule (e.g., “eMule TCP Port”), add the TCP port number that eMule uses (4660), select “TCP” and click Ok (see Figure 7).

Windows FirewallFigure 7: Adding the TCP port used by eMule.

Then click again on Add port, give a name to this rule (e.g., “eMule UDP Port”), add the UDP port number that eMule uses (4670), select “UDP” and click Ok (see Figure 8).

eMule Windows FirewallFigure 8: Adding the UDP port used by eMule.

These new rules will now be listed on Windows Firewall Exceptions tab, see Figure 9.

eMule Windows FirewallFigure 9: Windows Firewall exceptions.

But that isn’t all. We still need to add one more configuration to Windows Firewall.

Author: Gabriel Torres

Gabriel Torres is a Brazilian best-selling ICT expert, with 24 books published. He started his online career in 1996, when he launched Clube do Hardware, which is one of the oldest and largest websites about technology in Brazil. He created Hardware Secrets in 1999 to expand his knowledge outside his home country.

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