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Our Tests

The table below presents the results of our measurements. We repeated the same test on each cooler listed below, with the CPU at full load. On the model with software speed control, the fan speed was set on the control software that comes with the cooler, while on the other ones the fan speed was adjusted in the motherboard setup.

As we are comparing the temperature difference between the CPU and the air outside the computer (and not the actual CPU temperatures), there is no bias in taking measures under different room temperatures. Both heat transfer physics and our practical tests proved this.

Cooler Room Temp. Noise Speed Core Temp. Temp. Diff.
Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme (maximum) 17 °C 55 dBA 1,950 rpm 58 °C 41 °C
Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme (minimum) 17 °C 44 dBA 1,250 rpm 60 °C 43 °C
Thermaltake Water 3.0 Ultimate (maximum) 17 °C 56 dBA 1,900 rpm 41 °C 24 °C
Thermaltake Water 3.0 Ultimate (minimum) 17 °C 43 dBA 1,050 rpm 48 °C 31 °C
Corsair H100i GTX (maximum) 9 °C 59 dBA 2,600 rpm 34C 25 °C
Corsair H100i GTX (minimum) 9 °C 41 dBA 1,000 rpm 53 °C 44 °C
Cooler Master Nepton 240M (maximum) 13 °C 49 dBA 2300 rpm 39 °C 26 °C
Cooler Master Nepton 240M (minimum) 13 °C 39 dBA 900 rpm 58 °C 45 °C

In the graph below, you can see how many degrees Celsius hotter the CPU core is than the air outside the case. The lower this difference, the better is the performance of the cooler.

Cooler Master Nepton 240M

In the graph below, you can see how many decibels of noise each cooler makes.

Cooler Master Nepton 240M

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Rafael Otto Coelho is a physicist with a master’s degree in Education, and is a college professor in Brazil.