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Home » Video
XFX Radeon HD 5770 Video Card Review
Author: Gabriel Torres
Type: Reviews Last Updated: October 22, 2009
Page: 2 of 11
Introduction (Cont’d)

We removed the video card cooler to take a look. As you can see in Figure 5, the cooler has a copper base and copper fins. The cooler does not touch the memory chips

XFX Radeon HD 5770
click to enlarge
Figure 5: Video card cooler.

With the cooler removed you can see that almost all capacitors are solid, which is a terrific feature as they don’t leak (the ones that are not solid are from Elcon, a Chinese manufacturer). The memory chips from the component side have passive heatsinks, what doesn’t happen with the memory chips located on the solder side of the card. The transistors from the voltage regulator circuit don’t have a heatsink on them. In Figure 6 you can also see that this video card requires only one six-pin auxiliary power connector. A power supply with at least 450 W is the minimum recommended for this video card.

XFX Radeon HD 5770
click to enlarge
Figure 6: XFX Radeon HD 5770 with its cooler removed.

XFX Radeon HD 5770 uses eight 1 Gbit Hynix H5GQ1H24AFR-T2C GDDR5 chips, making its 1 GB memory (1 Gbit x 8 = 1 GB). These chips have a maximum transfer rate of 5 Gbps (“T2C” marking), which is equivalent of a 5 GHz GDDR5 clock or 1.25 GHz (5 GHz / 4) real clock. Since on this video card the memory was running at 1.2 GHz, there is a tiny 4.2% headroom for you to overclock the memories with them still running inside their specifications. Of course you can always try pushing them above their specs. In Figure 7 we provide a close-up of the GDDR5 memory chips.

XFX Radeon HD 5770
click to enlarge
Figure 7: GDDR5 memory chips.

This video card comes with one free game, Battle Forge. Instead of coming with the installation media, the card comes with instructions on how to download and activate the game with the included serial number.

In Figure 8, you can see all accessories that come with this video card: a quick installation guide, an installation guide, driver CD, the Battle Forge flyer, a power adapter for converting two peripheral power plugs into one six-pin video card power connector, a DVI-to-VGA adapter, a CrossFire bridge and a “do not disturb” sign.

XFX Radeon HD 5770
click to enlarge
Figure 8: Accessories.

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