Hardware Secrets

Home | Camera | Case | CE | Cooling | CPU | Input | Memory | Mobile | Motherboard | Networking | Power | Storage | Video | Other
Content
Articles
Editorial
First Look
Gabriel’s Blog
News
Reviews
Tutorials
Main Menu
About Us
Awarded Products
Datasheets
Dictionary
Download
Drivers
Facebook
Forums
Links
Manufacturer Finder
Newsletter
On The Web
RSS Feed
Test Your Skills
Twitter
Newsletter
Subscribe today!
Search
Recommended
Upgrading and Repairing PCs (21st Edition)
Upgrading and Repairing PCs (21st Edition), by Scott Mueller (Que Publishing), starting at $24.30



Home » Storage
Robson Technology Overview
Author: Gabriel Torres
Type: Articles Last Updated: September 26, 2006
Page: 2 of 2
Implementation

Intel will deliver Robson technology on a mini PCI Express card, which will contain the flash memory chips and their controller, see Figure 5. The presentation was based on a 1 GB solution and the current memory controller used can handle up to 8 GB of NAND flash memory.

Robson Technology
click to enlarge
Figure 5: Robson disk cache card.

Intel will sell this card to notebook manufacturers already assembled or in the form of a kit to be assembled by the manufacturer. Another option for notebook manufacturers is to assemble Robson technology components on the notebook’s motherboard.

If you pay close attention in Figure 5 you will see that the flash memory chips used are from Intel, and according to them at least initially they won’t allow notebook manufacturers to implement Robson technology to be used with memory chips from other vendors.

A simple block diagram of Robson technology can be seen in Figure 6.

Robson Technology
click to enlarge
Figure 6: Robson technology architecture overview.

It is compatible with both ReadyBoost and ReadyDrive technologies that will be available on Windows Vista.

ReadyBoost (formerly known as EMD, External Memory Device) is a feature implemented on Windows Vista that allows users to use any piece of flash memory like memory cards and USB drives as a memory cache.

ReadyDrive, on the other hand, is the command set used by Windows Vista to handle non-volatile memories. This technology is also known as PITON or T13.

« Previous |  Page 2 of 2
Print Version | Send to Friend | Bookmark Article | Comments (0)

Related Content
  • All Pentium M Models
  • All Core Duo and Core Solo Models
  • Everything You Need to Know About The Centrino Platform
  • Inside Atom Architecture
  • All Atom Models


  • RSSLatest News
    LUXA2 Releases New P1-PRO Battery Power Pack
    October 1, 2013 - 7:23 AM PST
    MSI unveils GP70 and GP60 Laptops
    September 30, 2013 - 7:23 AM PST
    AMD Unveils Next-Generation Radeon Graphics Cards
    September 27, 2013 - 5:33 AM PST
    Genius Introduces Energy Mouse in North America
    September 27, 2013 - 5:32 AM PST
    Apple Updates iMac
    September 25, 2013 - 5:27 AM PST
    .:: More News ::.







    2004-13, Hardware Secrets, LLC. All rights reserved.
    Advertising | Legal Information | Privacy Policy
    All times are Pacific Standard Time (PST, GMT -08:00)