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Home » Case
In Win Maelstrom Case Review
Author: Gabriel Torres 40,532 views
Type: Reviews Last Updated: October 9, 2009
Page: 1 of 7
Introduction
Hardware Secrets Golden Award

Maelstrom is a full-tower case from In Win having an interesting looks, foam pads to absorb noise and several features and supporting nothing less than 10 fans! Let’s take a look at this new release.

On Figures 1 and 2 you can have an overall look from Maelstrom. The two green tubes present on the front of the case give it a somewhat aggressive looks. These tubes, however, cannot be used as handles...

The left panel has a huge mesh coming with a 220 mm fan installed (no word on speed, airflow and noise level). The blades from this fan measure 210 mm, so this fan is actually bigger than some 230 mm fans that use 190 mm blades. It glows blue when turned on, but there is a switch on the left panel for you to turn its LED’s off. This fan is connected to a standard peripheral power plug and has only two wires, so you can’t monitor its speed through your motherboard.

By removing this big 220 mm fan you open space for installing up to six (yes, you read it right!) 120 mm fans on the side panel.

In Win Maelstrom case
click to enlarge
Figure 1: In Win Maelstrom case.

In Win Maelstrom case
click to enlarge
Figure 2: In Win Maelstrom case.

The front of the case can be seen in Figure 3. No door is present and the case has five external 5.25” bays. All bays use meshed covers featuring washable dust filters. On the lower part of the front panel there are three covers similar to the ones used on the 5.25” bays, i.e., meshed and with washable air filters. Maelstrom comes with a 120 mm fan behind these covers, this time using a small three-pin connector for you to connect it on your motherboard (and thus allowing speed monitoring). Once again, In Win does not say anything about airflow, noise level or rotational speed.

In Win Maelstrom case
click to enlarge
Figure 3: Front panel.

 

In Win Maelstrom case
click to enlarge
Figure 4: Front fan.

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